Why don’t more academics do Open Access publishing?

A report on a survey of 350 chemists and 350 economists in UK universities leads to the following conclusion about open access publishing:

…our work with researchers on the ground indicates to us that whatever the enthusiasm and optimism within the OA community, it has not spilled into academia to a large extent and has had only a small effect on the publishing habits and perceptions of ordinary researchers, whatever their seniority and whether in Chemistry or Economics.

The report finds that faculty members want to publish in high “impact factor” journals unless they have some specific reason why they should go the Open Access route, e.g., they need to get something out quickly. The subscriptions their libraries buy mask from them the extent to which their work becomes inaccessible to those who are not a university.

The report ends with some recommendations for trying to move academics towards OA publishing.

Library Lab/The Podcast 004: We Read in Public

Listen: 32:18
Also in ogg

Guarding patron privacy is kind of the default in the library business. When it comes to knowing who checked out what and when libraries usually prefer to flush the cache — except when it comes to collecting fines!

But in an age of public Amazon purchase lists, automatic tweets, and even sites setup to automatically share users’ credit card statements with the world at large, are libraries simply living in the past?

Jeff Jarvis, in public

That’s what Jeff Jarvis suggests.

A professor at the City University of New York’s Graduate School of Journalism, and one of the web’s most notorious oversharers, Jeff Jarvis sat down with Harvard Library Innovation Lab’s very own David Weinberger to talk about how the library can merge the values of privacy with the web’s power to share.

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Creative Commons music courtesy of Brad Sucks and photos courtesy of gypsy999 and richard.pyrker.

Library Lab/The Podcast 003: The Digital Citation

Listen: 27:09
Also in ogg

It starts with an idea: You’re a scholar and you use the web to search for sources. How can you collect your sources and their metadata without having to copy, paste, reformat? Or spend your starving researcher’s budget on some proprietary software?

That’s only the beginning for Zotero, a free, open-source plug-in for web browsers developed by the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University.

Zotero allows researchers to do much more than harness the power of the web to save citations. There is also a robust social component that allows researchers to share their research in progress.

Dan Cohen is the director of the Center for History and New Media and one of the minds behind the project. The Harvard Library Innovation Lab’s very own David Weinberger caught up with Dan for this week’s podcast to talk about Zotero, open syllabi, and other tools and ideas for enhancing and sharing research.

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Creative Commons music courtesy of Brad Sucks and photos courtesy of dan4th, orpost, and mendeley.

We’re in the Digital Public Library of America beta sprint!

We’ve entered the DPLA‘s “beta sprint,” along with thirteen fantastic partners (so far)!

The idea behind the beta sprint is that anyone with an idea about what the DPLA should be, how it should work, what it can do, or what it should look like should embody that idea in code or documentation, and submit it by September 1.

We’re proposing a version of ShelfLife re-thought for a potentially massive set of users whose interests and computer skills range all over the lot. And we’re proposing LibraryCloud as a middleware metadata server both to support ShelfLife and to make DPLA’s metadata available through open APIs and as Linked Open Data.

We’ve put up a page about our collaborative project, including our 400-word proposal to the DPLA. We’d love to hear from you.